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Galaxy S9’s Transceiver Technology Gets Involved in Patent Litigation
Another Patent Suit
Galaxy S9’s Transceiver Technology Gets Involved in Patent Litigation
  • By Cho Jin-young
  • June 25, 2018, 10:49
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The Galaxy S9 and Note series smartphone and tablet products including the Galaxy S9 are included in the lawsuit for a violation of a patent right by a non-practicing entity (NPE).
The Galaxy S9 and Note series smartphone and tablet products including the Galaxy S9 are included in a patent lawsuit filed by a non-practicing entity (NPE).

Samsung Electronics was recently sued for a violation of a patent right by a non-practicing entity (NPE) following a recent court ruling that it pay US$400 million in damages for patent infringement to the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). In particular, as the Galaxy S9 and Note series smartphone and tablet products including the Galaxy S9 are included in the lawsuit, there is a possibility that it will develop into a legal battle involving hundreds of billions of won.
 

On June 24, according to the smartphone industry, US-based NPE company Satius Holding, Inc. filed a patent infringement lawsuit against Samsung Electronics in the Delaware District Court in the US on June 5 (local time). Satius Holding said that an RF transceiver in the Galaxy smartphone infringed one of its patents. The RF transceiver receives a high frequency signal and modulates it into a low frequency band that a communication modem can process, and vice versa.

Satius Holding claimed that 36 kinds of smartphones such as the Galaxy S9 and S8 and four kinds of tablets including the Galaxy Tab S3 infringed on the patent in the litigation. In particular, the NPE said that its patent was used even in an RF transceiver in the Galaxy S9 Plus. The Galaxy S9 Plus is loaded with either Samsung Shannon 965 or Qualcomm SDR 845.

"In the past, signal transmission was often reflected in large cities and area with high-rise buildings, so the call quality of wireless smartphones was poor," Satius Holding said in the litigation. “Our patented technology realized high-speed data and voice communication over long distances by minimizing the effects of the reflection of signals."


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