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Conflicts over Ordinary Wage Grow at Asiana Airlines
Tricky Behavior
Conflicts over Ordinary Wage Grow at Asiana Airlines
  • By matthew
  • December 24, 2014, 06:06
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An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777-200ER climbs upwards from Sydney Airport in January 2007. (Photo by YSSYguy via Wikimedia Commons)
An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777-200ER climbs upwards from Sydney Airport in January 2007. (Photo by YSSYguy via Wikimedia Commons)

 

There is a growing controversy over a claim made by the labor union of Asiana Airlines. It argues that Asiana Airlines has committed illegal acts in the process of getting consent regarding the change of labor rules from its employees.

Asiana Airlines got written consent for the change of employment rules from its executives and employees by Dec. 17. The conflict between labor and management was created as the company required an open voting system, making threats against its employees while getting their consent.

Under a newly-revised rule proposed by Asiana Airlines, regular bonuses will not be included in ordinary wages. Instead, the company will pay other types of bonuses. In May, the court ruled that 600 percent of regular bonuses is the ordinary wage in Asiana Airlines.

The labor union insists that the company forced its employees to vote in favor of the revision, mentioning that they might experience various disadvantages unless they do so, in order to lower its ordinary wages.

The union said, “With the company ignoring the court’s ruling and changing the labor rules illegally, it is mentioning disadvantages in personnel matters to get the approval of the vast majority of employees. The company urged and threatened many employees to agree on the changes.”

Indeed, Asiana Airlines made an announcement on Dec. 9 that employees, who haven’t agreed on the changes of labor rules, will not be given incentives. The company said, “There was no illegal pressure or appeasement. The purpose of the changes is to close the pay gap among workers in different occupation groups.

Meanwhile, the Ministry of Employment and Labor conducted an investigation recently whether there was illegal activities in the process of changing the employment rules.