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Breakthrough in Water Purification And Cancer Treatment
Nanotag Research
Breakthrough in Water Purification And Cancer Treatment
  • By matthew
  • April 15, 2014, 06:16
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A green algal bloom in the Nakdong River, South Korea in 2012. Recent increased green algal blooms like this one are a suspected result of the Three Rivers Project.
A green algal bloom in the Nakdong River, South Korea in 2012. Recent increased green algal blooms like this one are a suspected result of the Three Rivers Project.

 

Blue-green cyanobacteria or toxic algal blooms, usually mucking up the rivers in the summertime, are useful after all. A local research team developed a new technology whereby florescent green carbon nanotags (G-tags) can be mass produced from cyanobacteria.

The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) announced on April 14 that their materials science team led by Dr. Lee Jou-hahn and Dr. Lee Hyun-uk successfully developed a new technology that allows the mass production of some 100 grams of carbon nanotags from about 100 kilograms of toxic cyanobacteria.

Photo-luminescent carbon nanotags produced from harmful green algal blooms can be used for cancer tracing and treatment.​Through the technology, from toxic cyanobacteria, the team mass-produced eco-friendly carbon nanotags with high solubility, photo-stability, and low cytotoxicity. By applying the treatment chemical liquid onto the surface of the extracted nanotags, it is possible to trace and destroy cancer cells at the same time. This new technology is called a ”disease locating and treating eco-friendly carbon nanotag mass production technique.”

It is anticipated to be a highly valuable technology. Since it utilizes toxic cyanobacteria that causes water pollution, it saves materials costs and alleviates pollution, solving ecological and economic problems at the same time.

Dr. Lee Jou-hahn said, “It is meaningful that the technology uses cyanobacteria to extract florescent carbon nanotags that can be used for cancer diagnosis and treatment. It opens the door to the commercialization of carbon diagnosis/treatment intended carbon nanotags that have high solubility and low cytotoxicity.”

The outcome of the research was featured in the online version of Scientific Reports, a sister magazine of Nature.