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LG Electronics Publicizing Korean Cultural Assets to U.K. through OLED Technology
A Media Showcase of Joseon Dynasty Documents
LG Electronics Publicizing Korean Cultural Assets to U.K. through OLED Technology
  • By Choi Moon-hee
  • January 13, 2020, 13:28
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LG Electronics' OLED TVs display “Gisa Jinpyori Jinchaneuigye” at the Korean Cultural Center in London of the United Kingdom.

LG Electronics announced on Jan. 12 that it was informing Korean cultural heritage of the Joseon Dynasty by participating in the media showcase of “Gisa Jinpyori Jinchaneuigye” at the Korean Cultural Center in London of the United Kingdom.

The event was prepared jointly by LG Electronics, the British Library, and a team led by professor Lee Bo-ah of Chung-Ang University. It runs from Jan. 9 to 22 (local time).

Gisa Jinpyori Jinchaneuikqe is a collection of paintings from the Joseon Dynasty produced in the year of “gisa” (1809) to document “jinpyori” (the raising of the outer and lining of clothes) and “jinchan” (royal party to celebrate a big national event). The paintings were published by King Sunjo in honor of the 60th anniversary of the wedding of Hyegyeonggung, the king’s grandmother.

This collection is the oldest among these kinds of collections that have been discovered so far. It was stolen from the Royal Outer Kyujanggak Library by France in 1866, and is now owned by the British Library.

LG Electronics' transparent OLED signage and signature OLED TV produce vivid and accurate colors, making people feel as if they were looking at the real collection before them.

In this showcase, LG Electronics also applied its own augmented reality (AR) gesture recognition technology to effectively show the cultural property. Accordingly, the screen of the transparent OLED signage changes according to the movements of viewers. They can also see the names and descriptions of instruments while viewing images of the instruments used in royal parties during the Joseon Dynasty.

In addition, by applying sound visualization technique that converts sound into visual images, images of instruments broken down into small particles along with court music follows viewers’ hand gestures.