Thursday, July 18, 2019
Hyundai E&C Develops Technology to Design Atypical Architecture
Atypical Engineering Automation
Hyundai E&C Develops Technology to Design Atypical Architecture
  • By matthew
  • January 1, 2014, 06:31
Share articles

The Sydney Opera House is a representative piece of atypical architecture. (Photo by Anthony Winning via Wikimedia Commons)
The Sydney Opera House is a representative piece of atypical architecture. (Photo by Anthony Winning via Wikimedia Commons)

 

Hyundai Engineering and Construction (Hyundai E&C) announced on December 2 that it has developed an “atypical engineering automation” technology called Building Information Modeling (BMI), enabling quick, automatic design of atypical architecture.

Atypical structure is an architectural term that refers to a structure that takes on a free form, unlike typical boxy-looking buildings. 

Atypical structures often become a landmark where they are built, but require highly-sophisticated technologies at all stages of construction, from design through engineering to execution, because of the peculiarity of the structure.

The BMI developed by Hyundai is an architectural technology that designs and formulates an optimized point of origin for constructing various points across the three-dimensional plane. 

Hyundai has been working on this project under a Memorandum of Understanding formed with American firm Gehry Technology and Britain’s Loughborough University.

Hyundai had BMI on public display at the Yeosu Expo last year, and is planning to use the technology to create an atypical roof of a waterfront resort project in Sri Lanka, which it won in October.