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New NO Transmitting Substance Expected to Contribute to Cardiovascular Disease Treatment
Drug Advancement
New NO Transmitting Substance Expected to Contribute to Cardiovascular Disease Treatment
  • By Cho Jin-young
  • April 23, 2015, 06:30
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The Institute for Basic Science is part of Daejeon Technopark in Daejeon, South Korea, about an hour's bullet train ride south of Seoul.
The Institute for Basic Science is part of Daejeon Technopark in Daejeon, South Korea, about an hour's bullet train ride south of Seoul.

 

The Institute for Basic Science announced on April 22 that its research team succeeded in selective NO separation by using carbene as a catalyst for the collection of gaseous NO, forming the collection into a solid mixture, and then applying heat. This means the development of a new transmitting substance that allows NO for therapeutic purposes to be attached to and detached from itself as needed, and is capable of effectively transmitting the NO in the human body so that it can be used in the treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases by assisting in vasodilation.

[[{"fid":"11263","view_mode":"body_image_right","fields":{"format":"body_image_right","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Synthesis of the N-heterocyclic carbene NO radical is based on the blowing of NO gas into a nitrogen-containing compound of N-heterocyclic carbene.","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","link_text":null,"attributes":{"alt":"Synthesis of the N-heterocyclic carbene NO radical is based on the blowing of NO gas into a nitrogen-containing compound of N-heterocyclic carbene.","height":202,"width":550,"class":"media-element file-body-image-right"}}]]Details of the research are available at the online edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society published on April 6.

NO is associated with various physiological functions in the human body such as vasodilation, cell signaling, and immunity. Therefore, NO has been widely studied as a therapeutic agent against angina, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis. NO reacts mainly with transition metal compounds, and thus metallic catalysts have been used in previous NO transmitter studies.

However, the research team succeeded in capturing NO in a solid state at this time by utilizing N-heterocyclic carbene, a nitrogen-containing cyclic compound, and proved that NO can be separated from it by means of heating, confirming the effectiveness of the new transmitting substance.

“This research outcome is the first proof showing that an organic catalyst can be used in the transmission of NO in place of a metallic one,” the team explained, adding, “This will allow us to find more ways of cardio-cerebrovascular disease treatment.”