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Korean Research Team Develops Dye-sensitized Solar Cells
Solar Cell Safety
Korean Research Team Develops Dye-sensitized Solar Cells
  • By matthew
  • October 14, 2014, 08:43
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The focus of the paper is the development of this triple-layer membrane, which makes cheaper and safer solar cells possible.
The focus of the paper is the development of this triple-layer membrane, which makes cheaper and safer solar cells possible.

 

Sejong University announced on Oct. 13 that a study conducted by a joint research team with the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) was selected as a cover article in the Sept. 16 issue of Advanced Energy Materials, a scientific journal published by Wiley-VCH. The team was led by Hong Sung-chul, professor of the Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering at Sejong University, and Lee Sang-young, professor at UNIST.

The title of the study is “Solar Cells: Triple-Layer Structured Composite Separator Membranes with Dual Pore Structures and Improved Interfacial Contact for Sustainable Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.”

The research findings were recognized for their contribution to enhancing the safety of solar cells by designing a separator membrane with a triple-layered structure and changing the structure of hydrocarbons so that the separator membrane can be used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

Dye-sensitized solar cells can produce electricity using a dye that generates power from the sun, and they have high energy efficiency thanks to cheap organic dye and nanotechnology. The manufacturing cost of dye-sensitized solar cells can be up to three times less than that of existing silicon-based solar batteries.

In particular, when used in glass, the dye-sensitized solar cells can either be transparent or give off various colors. It is also possible to put them on a window or windshield, since they let visible light through.

The research team anticipates that the study will become an example of the convergence of different technological areas such as lithium-ion batteries and dye-sensitized solar cells.

Professor Hong said, “I hope that our research findings will contribute to the commercialization of dye-sensitized solar cells.”