Friday, December 13, 2019
Foldable Memory Device on the Horizon
Wearable Computing
Foldable Memory Device on the Horizon
  • By matthew
  • April 22, 2014, 05:13
Share articles

This wearable device developed by scientists at MIT, in connection with an augmented book, attempts to convey the emotions experienced by the protagonist in the book in a visceral way to the wearer.
This wearable device developed by scientists at MIT, in connection with an augmented book, attempts to convey the emotions experienced by the protagonist in the book in a visceral way to the wearer.

 

A data storage device is expected to soon roll out that can be folded like paper and can be attached to wearable devices.

Yonsei University faculty member Park Chul-min and Lee Hyung-suk announced on April 21 that, in conjunction with Japanese and French research teams, they developed a next-generation foldable, non-flammable organic memory element by maximizing the resistance against element flexibility and deformation.

This new element can be easily produced by a simple liquidifying process, and is expected to be used widely for display, communication and storage devices for wearable computers due to its foldability.

According to developers’ explanations, the element can keep its stability even after being folded 1,000 times.

Professor Park says, “Products like wearable displays will require memory devices, but it will be hard to put in hard devices like a USB. We expect that wearable memory devices will be commercialized in five years.”

Bendable memory devices have been developed several times before, but they only bent a few millimeters, which makes it hard to be used in next-gen wearable electronics elements that are exposed to a variety of environments.

The research this time was sponsored by the Scientific Research Center Business spearheaded by the Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning and the National Research Foundation of Korea. The outcome of the research was published as a noteworthy thesis in the international academic journal “Nature Communications” on April 8.