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U.S., Japan, India and Australia Wary of One Belt and One Road Initiative of China
Accelerating Indo-Pacific Strategy
U.S., Japan, India and Australia Wary of One Belt and One Road Initiative of China
  • By Jung Suk-yee
  • February 23, 2018, 00:45
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The Indo-Pacific Strategy led by the United States, Australia, Japan and India are emerging against China’s One Belt and One Road Initiative and the Indo-Pacific Strategy.  The Chinese government’s One Belt and One Road Initiative and the Indo-Pacific Str
The Indo-Pacific Strategy led by the United States, Australia, Japan and India are emerging against China’s One Belt and One Road Initiative and the Indo-Pacific Strategy. The Chinese government’s One Belt and One Road Initiative and the Indo-Pacific Str

 

The Indo-Pacific Strategy led by the United States, Australia, Japan and India are emerging against China’s One Belt and One Road Initiative and the Indo-Pacific Strategy.

The Chinese government’s One Belt and One Road Initiative and the Indo-Pacific Strategy led by the United States, Australia, Japan and India are emerging as the two mainstreams of global economic competition and international political rivalry.

The upcoming summit meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is likely to become a major inflection point of the Indo-Pacific Strategy.

The Australian Financial Review recently reported that the U.S., Australia, Japan and India are currently working on a joint project in order to keep China at bay in Southeast Asia and the Pacific region. Regarding this report, the Chinese state-run newspaper Global Times remarked on February 22 that the project implies the four countries’ waning influence on the outside world. The Australian Financial Review also reported that Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will visit the United States soon in order to discuss this issue.

The four countries are trying to keep in check the One Belt and One Road Initiative more and more tightly these days. This has to do with concerns that increasing economic and political pressures from China may lead to sovereignty infringement in Southeast Asia and Australia.