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Samsung Electronics Files Patent for Wireless Charging Case for Gear S Watch
Wearables Charged on Smartphones
Samsung Electronics Files Patent for Wireless Charging Case for Gear S Watch
  • By Cho Jin-young
  • June 21, 2017, 05:00
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A patent image of Samsung’s smartphone case which charge a smart device, including the Gear S, wirelessly by placing on the top of the case.
A patent image of Samsung’s smartphone case which charge a smart device, including the Gear S, wirelessly by placing on the top of the case.

 

Samsung Electronics developed a wireless charging smartphone case that can charge a separate wearable smart device wirelessly by setting that device down onto the case and letting it rest there. It is part of the company’s efforts to settle a charging problem which is the biggest obstacle to popularize the Gear S series.

According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on June 20, Samsung Electronics filed a patent for the wireless smart watch charging smartphone case at the end of last year. 

The back of the case houses a power transmission coil and a USB-C type connector that links the case to a smartphone. The front side contains a magnetic coil that enables to charge wirelessly. When a wearable device is placed on the side, it can be wirelessly charged by using the electricity of smartphones. With the case, various smart devices like the Gear S can be charged anywhere anytime.

Foreign media, including Phone Arena, said, “Patent application does not necessarily lead to an actual release but various wearable devices will be popularized at a faster pace when the case is actually commercialized. The key is how to solve problems such as electromagnetic waves and heat.”

Apple also filed a patent for wireless charging using millimetric wave to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) at the end of 2015. It is unclear whether the company granted the patent but its technology also supply electricity to devices by containing a wireless charging circuit in iPhone cases.