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Conglomerates to Remove ‘Creative’ Trace at Creative Economy & Innovation Centers
Fading into History
Conglomerates to Remove ‘Creative’ Trace at Creative Economy & Innovation Centers
  • By Jung Suk-yee
  • March 17, 2017, 02:00
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Samsung changed the name of Samsung Creative Economy Complex in Daegu to Samsung Creative Campus in February this year.
Samsung changed the name of Samsung Creative Economy Complex in Daegu to Samsung Creative Campus in February this year.

 

As President Park Geun-hye was forced out of office due to the Choi Soon-sil Gate that triggered her impeachment, “creative economy,” one of the key policies promoted by former President Park Geun-hye, seems to be fading into history. Both Samsung and CJ are considering the name change of creative economy related projects, making movement to remove the trace of the former administration.

According to business industry sources on March 16, CJ Group is reportedly considering changing the name of the Culture Creative Convergence Center. In this regard, a CJ Group official said, “The name change is under review because we think we need a change. However, nothing has been decided yet.” With the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism having decided to abolished the Culture Creative Convergence Devision, and drastically cut back budgets for related projects, CJ, which already independently operates it, needs to change its name and management system, according to the company. However, it said that it will not change the basic operational policy to nurture venture companies with the same goal of fostering the culture industry.

Last month, Samsung changed the name of Samsung Creative Economy Complex in Daegu to Samsung Creative Campus. Recently, the company also decided to indefinitely postpone the opening ceremony. Industry watchers believe that Samsung intentionally exclude the word “creative economy” that reminds of the former Park administration.

The move is spreading to other conglomerates which fully supports the Centers for Creative Economy & Innovation (CCEI). An official from a large business, which is in charge of a regional center, said, “As most companies has appropriated related budgets this year about same as last year, they will not reduce support right away this year. However, we are not sure that we can continue to provide support next year because it is uncertain whether the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, which is the competent authority, can keep it going.“ Another conglomerate official, who asked not to be named, said, “Usually, the centers operate on government expenditures and local government’s budgets. Some local governments already reduced budgets on the centers so there will be difficulties to develop and invest in the creative economy. Employees at the CCEI, including full-timers, feel insecure about their jobs.”

The CCEI emerged as a main government’s policy project as former President Park said in the New Year’s press conference in 2014, “We will create a dynamic, creative economy through a creative economy. Starting with the Daegu center In September the same year, 18 CCEIs were established in 17 regions across the nation. Major large companies, such as Samsung, Hyundai Motor and SK, have worked together with the government and local governments to operate the centers.

However, there had not much positive effects because large businesses were forced to operate the center each, according to the business market and civic groups. In fact, People's Solidarity for Participatory Democracy said that it analyzed the total investments and new employment for a year at the North Chungcheong, Busan and South Jeolla CCEIs, and found out that 2.7 billion won (US$2.39 million) was invested in per person.