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Embassy of South Africa Screens Movie in Seoul about Racial Issues
Cultural Understanding
Embassy of South Africa Screens Movie in Seoul about Racial Issues
  • By Sara Rai
  • October 20, 2015, 04:45
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Ambassador of South Africa H.E. Nozuko Gloria Bam gives opening remarks at the screening of SKIN, a South African film, on Oct. 15 at the auditorium of the Seoul National Museum of History.
Ambassador of South Africa H.E. Nozuko Gloria Bam gives opening remarks at the screening of SKIN, a South African film, on Oct. 15 at the auditorium of the Seoul National Museum of History.

 

Ambassador of South Africa H.E. Nozuko Gloria Bam and President of the Korean Culture Association Jeong Jae-min at the screening of SKIN, a South African film held on Oct. 15 at the auditorium of the Seoul National Museum of History.
Ambassador of South Africa H.E. Nozuko Gloria Bam and President of the Korean Culture Association Jeong Jae-min at the screening of SKIN, a South African film held on Oct. 15 at the auditorium of the Seoul National Museum of History.

 

The Embassy of South Africa and the Korean Culture Association held a screening ceremony for “SKIN” at the Seoul Museum of History on Oct. 15. About 150 spectators, mostly members of diplomatic corps and members of the Korean Culture Association, attended the screening.  

SKIN is a 2008 biographical film based on the book, “When She Was White” by Judith Stone, which portrays a true story of a family divided by race at the peak of the apartheid era in South Africa. 

On the occasion, Ambassador Bam stated, ”Only by learning from each other, the culture of each country can make its own advancement. South African cinema is an important medium in promoting those common values, notably in fighting against prejudice, intolerance and discrimination, in provoking individual and collective aspirations for more freedom and emancipation, and uniting people of all origins, creeds, and beliefs while celebrating their diversity.” 

The screening was organized to expose South African perspectives on socially relevant issues presented in the film. It was directed by Anthony Fabian, and is perceived as one of the most moving stories to emerge from apartheid South Africa. It is based on a true story that follows Sandra’s thirty-year journey from rejection to acceptance, betrayal to reconciliation, as she struggles to define her place in a changing world - and triumphs against all odds. The film finds a way of dramatizing race, class, and society in apartheid-era South Africa. It boasts fine performances by Sophie Okonedo, Sam Neill, and Alice Krige as a family whose refusal to conform was either heroic, tragi-comic, or merely dysfunctional.