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Hyundai Heavy Industries, GE Develop Next-gen LNG Carrier with Gas Turbine Engines
Environmentally-friendly Gas Carrier
Hyundai Heavy Industries, GE Develop Next-gen LNG Carrier with Gas Turbine Engines
  • By matthew
  • July 7, 2015, 10:15
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Shin Hyun-soo (6th from left), an executive of Hyundai Heavy Industries, and Jeremy Barnes (7th from left), Commercial Marine Marketing Director at GE Aviation, pose with colleagues after signing an Approval in Principle agreement.
Shin Hyun-soo (6th from left), an executive of Hyundai Heavy Industries, and Jeremy Barnes (7th from left), Commercial Marine Marketing Director at GE Aviation, pose with colleagues after signing an Approval in Principle agreement.

 

Hyundai Heavy Industries, in association with U.S.-based General Electric's (GE) Aviation Marine business unit, has succeeded in developing an environmentally-friendly LNG carrier with a gas turbine engine.

Hyundai Heavy Industries recently received Approval in Principle (AIP) from the global classification agency British Lloyd's Register for the feat of developing the first LNG carrier with a size of 174,000 m3 to mount GE’s new gas turbine system.

GE Aviation Marine Division, located in Ohio, is an entity that supplies a world-class marine propulsion system, products, and services, including an air derivative gas turbine that measures between 4.5 MW and 52 MW.

The newly-developed LNG carrier is the first to be powered by GE's new gas turbine technology called “COGES,” or Combined Gas turbine, Electric & Steam. The carrier boasts an optimized structure, low cost, and upgraded capabilities, meeting expectations set by the buzzwords “safety,” “efficiency,” and “environmental friendliness.”

As the LNG carrier powered by GE’s gas turbine engine satisfies the environmental regulations of IMO Tier III without an exhaust gas treatment system as part of its system, it is possible to reduce the investment and operating costs to build the system.  In fact, a 174,000 m3 LNG carrier powered by GE’s gas turbine engine has proven to save about 200 billion won (US$176.6 million) over 20 years of operation.

The gas turbine engine is lighter than a conventional engine by a maximum of 60 percent. With better performing ships, the operator of the gas turbine engine can save on operating costs. Ignition does not require a separate use of fuel, and thus the maintenance cost is minimal.

In addition, the ship has great safety standards and stability. Capable of operating for more than 70 million hours, GE's gas turbine power generation is used on offshore platforms, onshore development, and high-speed ferries. Ships with GE’s gas operate with low vibration and quiet performance, like ferries do.

Shin Hyun-soo, the executive of Hyundai Heavy Industries, said, “This LNG with a gas turbine engine represents the collaboration between Hyundai Heavy Industries, the company with the world’s leading marine technology, and GE, the world’s leader in gas turbine technology,” adding, “Through technological cooperation, including manufacturing large containers, we will continue to work together to enhance our competitiveness.

Brien Bolsinger, vice president of the GE Aviation Marine Division, said, “We have put a lot of effort to complete the development of LNG carriers equipped with a gas turbine engine technology. Obtaining AIP, GE, along with Hyundai, will confidently bring to the world market LNG with gas turbine engines.”